121008 - River - India - and Beyond ! ONLY Puthri not Brahmaputhra

[postlink]http://drtps-videos.blogspot.com/2012/10/dear-dr.html[/postlink]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=SomoIzYNqX0endofvid
[starttext]by Dr.T.P.Sasikumar
[endtext]




2 comments:

Dr T P Sasikumar said...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=SomoIzYNqX0

Dr T P Sasikumar said...

Dear Dr. Sasikumar,

I am writing this in continuation with the message that I left on your Facebook ID regarding a question I have.

I didn't know about you until I came across some of your videos on Youtube while casually surfing internet, which I liked.

Coming directly to the point, in the video related to the Sloka to be chanted before bathing (youtube link), I liked and agreed with your logic of holding water in hand for sometime in order to acquaint (or predispose) the body for the oncoming interaction. And in another video where you talk about this same Sloka, you also beautifully expand on the fact that the Sloka makes one relate to the true understanding that the source of water is same, be it from any river.

Now coming to the question, whose context is more historical than philosophical, I would like to ask the reasons (if any) for the choice of rivers. I understand that those are the major rivers, but then why yet another prominent one i.e. Brahmputra does not figure. It leads one to believe that it was written at the time of a particular empire (Bharat) which then had this particular political boundary including only the rivers mentioned in the Sloka. But doesn't this limit the philosophical domain and range of the Sloka, if I may say so. Another argument that adds to this point is not using the generalization of 'all water on earth coming from the same source', and rather singling out the rivers of a particular political boundary. It keeps the Sloka a step away from universal applicability, or so it feels.

I know the question is not a very profound one, but it occurred to me during the video. I would appreciate if you could throw some light on it.

Thanks & Regards,

Narinder Singh

Dear

Greetings

Seen the comments.

Glad to see the close attention and the interest you have in this area.

You are right.

May be the Bharatha / all the story that is on Bharath is south of MERU. and that too in the West side approach.

Brahmaputhra runs on the east and beyond Himalaya - that too is a MALE river.

It is very distinct and different.

I have no definite and clear answer on this.. these are only my comments and views.

Shall think / find out from other sources and If I get I shall get back to you.

I am sure u too will be ready to update me when u get the answer.

Love to see your introduction please.

God Bless You.

Sasneham

DrTPSasikumar

MSc, MPhil, PhD, LLB, MBA, MS

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PROFESSOR & HoD, MANAGEMENT, Aurora's Engineering College, JNTU-Hyderabad, Bhuvanagiri.

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Narinder Singh


7:14 PM (6 minutes ago)





to me

Dear Dr. Sasikumar,

Thanks for your quick and detailed response.

I hail from Punjab and am currently working as a posdoctoral researcher at the University of Delaware, USA. My little spiritual training, if any has been in Aad Granth (Sikhism), from where I am more accustomed to the generalized beliefs. That is why this question came to me.

I will definitely share with you in case I come across something relevant. Nevertheless, your point of Brahmputra being male river does hint at some sort of philosophical connotations.

Nice to make this acquaintance.

Thanks & Regards,

Narinder Singh

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